A Field Trip underground.

Today, I was able to go on a Field Trip to the old Rammelsberg Mine in Goslar. And we were actually able to Mine Shaft that is usually not open to the general public.

In the Rammelsberg Mine, they used to extract mainly Lead, Copper and Zinc from the Rock until it was closed in 1988. Gold ans Silver were also found there.

The Mines surface Buildings today.

Back in the 1930’ies, the Nazis pumped millions of Reichsmarks into the Mine and built the Aufbereitung, where the mined Ores were refined, to support their War effort. Most of the Mines surface Buildings were built in that time.


After the War ended, the Rammelsberg Mine continued to operate under the helm of the Preussag AG, which was transformed into TUI, a Tourism and Travel Company in 2002 (Wikipedia). The Mine later seized operations in 1988.

In the Aufbereitung.

As I have previously stated, we were able to visit a Mine Shaft that is not open to the general public, the Hängebankstollen. After the Rammelsberg Mine was closed in 1988, it was originally planned to demolish all the Buildings and backfill the Mineshafts.


Luckily, those Plans were thwarted by local Citizens, and a Museum was developed in the Mine. In 1992, the Rammelsberg Mine was accepted as a UNESCO World Heritage Site that now also includes the Oberharzer Wasseregal.

Close to the Hängebankstollen.

Back in 2018, I have already been in the Aufbereitung for a Photoshoot with my Formula Student Team. That was also a great deal of fun. Back then, I did not know that there is a Harzer Wandernadel Stempelstelle at the Rammelsberg.


Today, I was finally able to get that Stamp, numbered 91 in the System. It actually felt good to collect a Stamp again after not being able to for a while.

The GVRacer 7 back in 2018.

I really love it to Explore old industrial places like this Mine. I always feel so inspired in such places.